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American Public Health Association honors Peace

The American Public Health Association recently presented one of three Statistics Section Awards to Karl E. Peace, professor of biostatistics in Georgia Southern University’s Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, at its annual meeting in Washington, D.C. The award was presented to Peace by David Williamson, a Georgia Southern University alumnus and Director of the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) in the CDC’s- Division of Health Studies.

‘I accepted this award on behalf of the Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health and Georgia Southern University with a lot of pride,” Peace said. ‘I believe this recognition will benefit us as we progress toward national accreditation.”

The award was presented to Peace for his biostatistical contributions to drug research and development. Peace made pivotal contributions to the development and approval of Tacrine, the first drug approved for the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease; Gemfibrozil, the first drug approved for the reduction of Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) risk; and Cytotec, the first drug approved for the prevention of NSAID induced gastric ulceration.

More than 100 people attended the presentation, including Peace’s son and daughter-in-law, his colleagues Charles Hardy, dean of the Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, and Stuart Tedders, director of the Center for Rural Health and Research. Doctoral student Kelley Chester also attended the APHA meeting and the presentation.

Following a first career in university teaching, Peace established his second career in research, technical support and management in the pharmaceutical industry. He held leadership positions at Burroughs-Wellcome, A.H. Robins, SmithKline and French, G.D. Searle, and Warner Lambert/Parke-Davis. He founded Biopharmaceutical Research Consultants, Inc. (BRCI), a contract research organization providing a full line of services for the research and development of pharmaceutical compounds, focusing on the conduct of clinical (trial) investigations. In addition to making pivotal contributions in the development and approval of drugs to treat Alzheimer’s disease, to reduce the risk of myocardial infarction, and to prevent and treat gastrointestinal ulcers, Peace also made key contributions to the development and approval of several drugs to treat anxiety, depression, panic attacks, hypertension, stroke, cancer, arthritis, and infections.

Following his career in the pharmaceutical industry, Peace returned to academe and helped lay the groundwork for the Jiann-Ping Hsu College of Public Health, which is named for Peace’s late wife, an internationally recognized statistics scholar. He is also the founding director of the Karl E. Peace Center for Biostatistics.

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